Looking back, looking forward…

Steve Wiegand of the Sacramento Bee brings us a fascinating blast from the past, explaining some of the details with Gov. Earl Warren’s attempt at health care reform many decades ago. The question is whether the current Republican Governor’s second attempt at health reform (he says he’s committed) will be more successful…

Lots of posts about state and national health reform in this week’s Health Wonk Review, hosted by Joe Paduda at Managed Care Matters. It nicely spotlights our recent post asking what’s wrong with the restaurants…

Ground zero in health care reform (at least one of the ‘zeros’) is San Francisco, perhaps the largest political entity in this country to legislate universal coverage. Anthony Wright finds the most vocal opposition to Healthy San Francisco came not from insurers, or pharma, or physicians or neocons, but restaurants. From his desk, it looks like the restaurant’s opposition may be backfiring, as some patrons are happy to pay a surcharge to cover their server’s health benefits.

I’ve always said that given the raw numbers, Los Angeles was the ground zero in the uninsured crisis in the nation–so maybe it’s appropriate California offer a ground zero in the solution–hopefully Sacramento will re-establish it’s claim to that mantle as well.

Other interesting posts noted include:
* a series on the state of America’s health system by Tom Lynch (a four-part post: One, Two, Three and Four), trying to answer the question is our system is the best in the world…
* a Colorado look at a proposal to allow out-of-state plans to offer coverage by Louise Norris–she notes all the problems with such a proposal in terms of undermining state consumer protections and markets; and while these consumer protections are national, I think there’s a role for the states in insurance regulation;
* and Jason Shifrin on a minimum benefits requirement for health insurance–an issue we are trying to tackle with SB1522 (Steinberg), which we believe strikes the right balance, allowing lots of choice and variation that is in the insurance market right now, but have some standardization to prevent the “junk” insurance plans that really don’t provide even catatrophic coverage, and allow for apples-to-apples comparisons for consumers.

Health Access California promotes quality, affordable health care for all Californians.

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